Sodium Reduction Framework

This framework summarizes the recommended components of a comprehensive dietary sodium reduction program, and provides links to existing implementation tools, examples of successful programs and other resources.

  1. Governance
  2. Surveillance
  3. Packaged foods
  4. Food prepared outside the home
  5. Sodium added in the home
  6. Appendices & Acknowledgments

Introduction

This framework summarizes the recommended components of a comprehensive dietary sodium reduction program, and provides links to existing implementation tools, examples of successful programs and other resources.

It is designed to be used by governments and their partners in the planning, development and revision of dietary sodium reduction programs. It can also be used to standardize evaluation and review of these programs.

In some cases, as cited in this framework, sodium reduction is addressed through a stand-alone national strategy or program; however, sodium reduction can also be integrated into a broader noncommunicable disease or nutrition strategy. The components of this framework are relevant to both approaches. Cities and regions may also be able implement many of the strategies included in this framework and can work to complement national action.

The framework is organized into five major categories that make up a comprehensive sodium reduction program:

  1. Governance
  2. Surveillance
  3. Interventions for packaged foods
  4. Interventions for food prepared outside the home (i.e., restaurants, cafeterias)
  5. Interventions for sodium added at home (i.e., at the table and in cooking)

Several high-priority strategies are outlined for each type of intervention. In some cases, innovative or incompletely tested strategies are listed, particularly in areas where existing solutions are limited, evidence is still emerging, or research on impact has been mixed.

For each component of the framework, a list of resources is provided to guide readers in implementing the strategies. The resources are divided into 1) implementation tools: practical guides or toolkits, 2) other resources: scientific literature, background documents, relevant global guidance, etc., and 3) examples: real world case studies from cities and countries that have implemented these strategies in their local context. The resources and examples provided are not meant to be used as a comprehensive guide but aim to offer users suggestions for further reading on each topic. The resources are limited to resources published in English language. The framework will be reviewed and updated over time; new resources and examples will be added periodically. Here you’ll find a brief survey where you can submit additional resources and suggestions.

This document is accompanied by a checklist and monitoring tool, found in Appendix 1.